How To Strengthen Your Mindset For 2018

How To Strengthen Your Mindset For 2018

Leadership | Posted by - December 28, 2017 at 12:30 am

How we think about and see the world is influenced by the people we surround ourselves with. Equally important is our ability to challenge our own opinions and perspectives, and one of the great ways to do so is to read books and essay from experts around the world. Ahead of 2018, YouInc rounded up some of our favourite passages that challenge what it means to be ambitious, courageous, resourceful, and enough: 


From The Art of Frugal Hedonism: A Guide To Spending Less While Enjoying Everything More 

Australians Annie Raser-Rowland and Adam Grubb challenge us to rethink what it means to be resourceful. Their guidebook shows it’s possible to be more mindful of the environment and our wallets, without feeling like it’s work: 

“More good is not always better: It’s not just our gear that we tend to assume we should improve if we have the capacity to. Humans feel a strong compulsion to say ‘yes’ to anything our culture has deemed Good, from a promotion (even if we already feel overwhelmed at work) to an all-expenses paid trip to speak at a conference in Barcelona (even if we are already way too busy for comfort). Frugal Hedonism is partly about noticing when less might be more, and that applies to activity just as much as in the realm of consumption. If you’re too busy, don’t add a new commitment unless you can ditch a current one. If you’re already loving life, check whether saying yes to another project could steal important time from some less visible aspects of your world. It’s as much about the spaces between things as it is about the things themselves, man…”

From Daring Greatly: How The Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead by Brene Brown

There’s not a single person who doesn’t experience self-doubt. Though, how we handle self-doubt can determine whether we rise with anxiety or rise ready to take on the day. This passage from Brene Brown’s book, Daring Greatly, will challenge you to rethink your morning routine:

“For me, and for many of us, our first waking thought of the day is “I didn’t get enough sleep.”  The next one is, “I don’t have enough time.” Whether true or not, the thought of not enough occurs to us automatically before we even think to question or examine it. We spend most of our hours and the days of our lives hearing, explaining, complaining, or worrying about what we don’t have enough of...Before we even sit up in bed, before our feet touch the floor, we’re already inadequate, already behind, already losing, already lacking something. And by the time we go to bed at night, our minds are racing with a litany of what we didn’t get, or didn’t get done, that day. We go to sleep burdened by those thoughts and wake up to that reverie of lack...This internal condition of scarcity, this mindset of scarcity, lives at the very heart of our jealousies, our greed, our prejudice, and our arguments with life…” 


From Essay, The Snarling Girl: Notes on--and against--ambition by Elisa Albert

Ambition doesn’t mean anything, if you don’t action your ideas. This excerpt published from Hazlitt presents a series of questions to help analyze your ambition, and whether you need to alter your ways:

“What kind of person are you? What kind of craft have you honed? What is my experience of looking into your eyes, being around you? Are you at home in your body? Can you sit still? Do you make me laugh? Can you give and receive affection? Do you know yourself? How sophisticated is your sense of humor, how finely tuned your understanding of life’s absurdities? How thoughtfully do you interact with others? How honest are you with yourself? How do you deal with your various addictive tendencies? How do you face your darkness? How broad and deep is your perspective? How willing are you to be quiet? How do you care for yourself? How do you treat people you deem unimportant?”


From Essay, You And Your Research by Richard Hamming

In 1986, former Bell Labs Scientist Richard Hamming gave the talk, You And Your Research, at the Morris Research and Engineering Center. Hamming shared insights from his 40 years of experience observing scientists, who have made great contributions, and what, how, and why they did things. One of these topics is courage and the ability to persevere through hard problems: 

“One of the characteristics of successful scientists is having courage. Once you get your courage up and believe that you can do important problems, then you can. If you think you can't, almost surely you are not going to. Courage is one of the things that Shannon had supremely. You have only to think of his major theorem. He wants to create a method of coding, but he doesn't know what to do so he makes a random code. Then he is stuck. And then he asks the impossible question, “what would the average random code do?'' He then proves that the average code is arbitrarily good, and that therefore there must be at least one good code. Who but a man of infinite courage could have dared to think those thoughts? That is the characteristic of great scientists; they have courage. They will go forward under incredible circumstances; they think and continue to think.”

Which essay or book passages do you revisit from time-to-time? Share a link in the comments below.

Tags: books, business advice, courage, inspiration, motivation, new years resolutions, resolutions

Kristen Marano

Kristen Marano is a writer based in Toronto, Canada, and Perth, Australia. She’s passionate about connecting women in business to share honest stories and perspectives about the emotional challenges of their work. Follow Kristen on Twitter at

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